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DSL Book Pro's
London,

MidWinterBlood, Review by Simon, Year 7
I liked this book. It wasn't at all bad. Of course it wasn't the BEST book I've read (That prize would go to the book Wonder) but it was still a great book. It contained a fantasy plot, alongside with a strong story of the characters. It was great, I liked this book. I would rate it 8.5/10.
Posted on: 10 May 2013





Posted on: 10 May 2013





Posted on: 10 May 2013





Posted on: 10 May 2013





Posted on: 10 May 2013





Posted on: 10 May 2013





Posted on: 10 May 2013



A Greyhound of a Girl, Review by Ayana, Year 7
This story is about a girl called Mary who met her great-grandmother, Tansey; and she is a ghost. And at the same time, her grandmother, Emer, is in the hospital, worried when she will die. And they, Mary, her mother, Scarlett, Emer and Tansey step out for the last, glourious adventure for Emer before she will die. I really liked this book because it tells you how you feel like when you are so worried when you might die in a few hours and also how it feels like to lose a family, who you love. I recommend this book to you, whoever you are, whether you are a girl, boy, lady, gentlemen, because this book is suitable for anyone, for all ages. I also recommend this book to you who are feeling a bit sad because you have lost someone who you love, whether it was your family member, your great friend or your lover. It also makes your strength and mind stronger.
Posted on: 10 May 2013





Posted on: 10 May 2013



Wonder: R.J Palacio, Review by Simon, Year 7
This book is just absolutely brilliant. I LOVED it. I loved the characters, the plot and the backstory of every single characters. The main story was beatiful and the book just gripped me for the entire book. I would rate it 10/10 because this book was the first book EVER that I actually enjoyed.
Posted on: 10 May 2013





Posted on: 10 May 2013



Everybody Jam
Everybody Jam is an interesting book set in the Australian Outback. Danny Dawson isn’t having a great time as his brother Jonny died a couple of years ago. His sister Sissy is pregnant at the age of 14, but no one knows who the father is. The family hire a house girl so they can have more time to do other things. When the girl arrives, she doesn’t know much about Australia as she is from England. She makes lots of mistakes at first, Danny wants her to leave, but they all give her chances. Throughout the book, the “Pommie” learns more and more about life in the Australian Outback. She helps in the annual muster, which is where they separate the weak cattle and the strong cattle, understands more of their language and words, and gets to know the family a lot better. This book is different to books I usually read, but I am quite glad I read it as I saw how things changed for Danny and his family, because of Liz, the “Pommie”. The language can be quite hard to understand at first as the author uses a lot of Australian slang but you get used to it. I also found that it started off quite slowly, but once you got into it, it got more interesting. Overall, I found this book different, but interesting. I would have never picked this book up in a library, but I’m glad I’ve had the chance to read it! Alysia Georgiades-8C
Posted on: 01 Jun 2012



My Name is Mina
My Name is Mina is a fantastic book by David Almond. It is the prequel to the extraordinary Skellig. This book does not exactly have a story line to it but it is an exciting, interesting and intelligent journal of a young girl named Mina. What I really loved about My Name is Mina is that it explains so much about the world and there are so many different points of views that it really makes you think and wonder. In the book she writes about her day, what she likes, what she thinks and anything that comes to her mind. Which was really interesting to read about because it was not just some boring old, simple book that just goes on and on, it really makes you appreciate things around you, the world and also it makes you think about things; anything; everything. She tells stories about things that excite her and things she really hates. She does many exhilarating things that inspire you to do things that you’ve never done before but you really want to try. It also tells you things you can try out, it gives you extraordinary facts and thrilling things that excite her and thinks will excite the reader. The book also tells you many fascinating facts. These facts range from birds, owls and cats to the underground and old Greek gods and also about heaven and where people go when they die. And that it why it’s such wonderful book and it really engrossed me. I would recommend it to anybody who really likes to get into books and who really likes to read, because I just couldn’t stop reading it. It was a really gripping and fabulous book. Anyone could like it. Lydia Testa – 8C
Posted on: 16 May 2012



Small Change for Stuart: the review
Small Change for Stuart by Lissa Evans is a combination of mystery and a little bit of fantasy. Stuart Horten (S.Horten or Shorten) is a short and very curious 10-year-old with insensible parents. Tall and smart, but insensible parents. Stuart's father is a crossword author, and his mother a nurse. The family moves to Beeton, Stuart's father's childhood home, because it is close to his mother's new hospital where she will be working. But as insensible parents, they decided to move at the beginning of summer vacation. Stuart would have to spend his whole summer vacation not knowing anyone because usually, kids make friends more easily at school. Then he discovers that his father's paperclip tin is really a magic trick invented by his great uncle. A message inside a secret compartment says that if Stuart's father is the right kind of child, and can find it, his hidden workshop will be his. But Stuart's dad was not the kind of person who wanted to inherit his magician-uncle's workshop, plus he didn't even discover the message. Stuart decided that he should inherit this "magical" workshop. He starts investigating, when his new next-door neighbor, April (a triplet) catches him and writes in her newspaper that Stuart is a criminal for snooping around "private property", which was Great-uncle Tony's house. When Stuart told her what he was really doing, April decided to help. For me, that was strange because one minute, Stuart was running full-speed way from her, and another he was telling her the biggest secret. Then he meets Leonora, Great-Uncle Tony's wife's sister, who has been wondering where both of them disappeared ever since they died. But Jeannie, who lives in Leonora's house, wants to steal the workshop as soon as Stuart finds it. It was also awkward for me when Stuart gasps that Jeannie is the mayoress, because he should know what his own mayoress looks like. Did he find the workshop? Did Jeannie steal it from him? Please read the book and help us rate it. In my opinion, some of the details in th book could've been changed to be better, but overall, well written, so *** (three stars) Takuma Enomoto 7E
Posted on: 14 May 2012



"My Sister Lives on a Mantelpiece" - Review
The book I have recently read is called ‘My Sister Lives on a Mantelpiece’ by Annabel Pitcher. This book is the kind that grabs your attention straight away. It makes you feel as if you’re inside the book yourself, as if you are the main character, going through what they are going through. ‘My Sister Lives on a Mantelpiece’ is an emotional roller coaster, with feelings hitting you at unexpected times. This book is about a young boy called James, who is dealing with the death of his older sister, the pain of his parents divorce and the life he has living with his alcoholic father whilst his mother goes of with her new boyfriend. Ever since his sister died James’ father has built a wall of hatred towards Muslims, because of what happened to Rose (his sister) but things take an unexpected twist when James’ befriends a young Muslim girl called Sunya. Will his dad find out? ‘My Sister Lives on a Mantelpiece’ is an emotional roller coaster, with feelings hitting you at unexpected times. I give this 9/10 Davina Year 7
Posted on: 14 May 2012



Small Change for Stuart
I think that the book Small Change for Stuart was an okay book about a boy trying to uncover and inquire about his great-uncle’s magical workshop. One thing that I personally would have changed if I wrote the book would be that I would make it so it did not just centre on Stuart, it could switch around from character to character a bit more, for example it could have shown the triplets who lived next door’s life a little more. One more thing that I would change is how the father was very laid back but seemed sophisticated when he talked. I would make it either he was sophisticated or he was laid back, not both attributes in the same person. Overall I would rate this book 5 or 6/10. Jeremy Year 7
Posted on: 14 May 2012



Between Shades Of Gray by Ruta Sepetys
Between Shades Of Gray by Ruta Sepetys is a book set in 1941 about how innocent civilians from Lithuania were deported by the soviets into Siberia. The book follows a 15 year old girl with her younger brother and mother as they make the perilous journey through Russia. This book is amazingly well written and I would definitely recommend it. 5 STARS FROM ME!!!! from Luca in Year 7
Posted on: 08 May 2012



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