All Winners
Carnegie Winners
Greenaway Winners
Browse and Search
70 Years Celebration



   
   

Winning Year: 1956
Author: C S Lewis
Title: The Last Battle

Original Publisher: Bodley Head
Current Publisher: HarperCollins
Format:
ISBN: 0006716822
In Print


A false Aslan is roaming the land of Narnia, forcing the terrified Narnians to work for the evil Calormenes. Jill Pole and Eustace Scrubb find themselves called back to Narnia just one more time to help them in their biggest and most frightening battle against injustice yet alongside King Tirian, who helps to lead them in the almighty struggle between good and evil.



Christian death Narnia religion

 

Clive Staples Lewis was born in Ireland, on the outskirts of Belfast, on 29 November 1898. He had one older brother, Warren, who was three years his senior. When C. S. Lewis (or "Jack", as he was called) was 9 years old his mother died of cancer and soon after her death, in 1908, he was sent to join his brother at Wynyard Boarding School. Jack was only there for a year before returning to Northern Ireland where he attended Campbell College, Belfast. A few years later he traveled back to England and spent his last school years at Malvern College in Worcestershire and with private tutor, Mr Kirkpatrick.

He started at University College, Oxford but his studies were interrupted by the First World War where he served with the Somerset Light Infantry. In 1919 he returned to Oxford and gained a triple first. In 1925 he was elected Fellow of English Language and Literature at Magdalen College. In 1954 he became Professor of Mediaeval and Renaissance Literature at Cambridge. An outstanding and popular lecturer, C. S. Lewis had a lasting influence on all his students.

For many years C.S. Lewis was an atheist, and described his conversion at the age of 33 to Christianity in Surprised By Joy. It was this experience that helped him to understand not only apathy but active unwillingness to accept religion, and as a Christian writer, gifted with an exceptionally brilliant and logical mind and a lucid, lively writing style, C.S. Lewis was without peer. He and his good friend J.R.R. Tolkien, the author of the Lord of the Rings trilogy, were part of the Inklings, an informal writers' club that met at a local pub to discuss story ideas.

C.S. Lewis began writing The Chronicles of Narnia in 1949 and completed the seven books in the series in 1956.

His works are known to millions of people all over the world, and have been translated across the globe. C. S Lewis married Joy Davidman Gresham, an American poet from New York and admirer of Lewis, in 1956. Soon after the marriage Joy was diagnosed as having cancer and she died in 1960. C.S. Lewis died on 22 November 1963 at his home in Oxford.

 





Sponsored by: