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Resources

The CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal 2010 - Visual Literacy Activities
by Liz George



THE SHORTLIST

Crazy Hair
Harry and Hopper
Leon and the Place Between
Millie's Marvellous Hat
The Dunderheads
The Graveyard Book
The Great Paper Caper
There Are Cats in this Book


Crazy Hair

Written by Neil Gaiman and Illustrated by Dave McKean

ISBN 978-0-7475-9526-7

Use the double page spread depicting the character saying, "Miss, just be Aware This is really crazy hair."

Working in pairs, encourage children to explore the picture discussing their responses and working together to make meaning of what they see. Ask them to jot down words and phrases, which reflect their responses to looking.

The aims of this activity are:

  • to increase the interaction with and enjoyment of picture books for children of all ages
  • to develop children's confidence and vocabulary to respond to what they see – to observe and describe
  • to encourage them to build on their previous experience, imagination and understanding to make sense of visual information – to interpret
  • to consider a variety of graphic forms and their interaction with a text in order to convey layers of meaning – to appreciate
  • to recognise different styles and techniques used and developed by a variety of illustrators – to analyse
  • to begin to recognise and appreciate visual metaphor, irony, puns and jokes etc. – to participate

The following questions have been designed to help children to look more closely at the illustrative work of Dave McKean, moving from the whole picture to the smallest part and to search for and use all available clues given by the artist to make meaning. Please select and adapt the questions to make them appropriate for your setting.

TELL ME ABOUT DAVE McKEAN'S ILLUSTRATION. . .

Who do you think the character with the hair is?

How do you think they feel about their hair?

What do you notice about the perspective of this illustration?

From what point does the illustrator intend you to view this picture?

What do you notice about the proportions of the man's body?

Notice how his fingers go off the right hand side of the page, what is the effect of this?

Look at his facial expression, how would you describe them?

How do you think the illustrator has created this three dimensional face?

Consider the impact of the disc eyes and the presence of real eyeballs in the 'a's' in 'crazy' and 'hair'. What or whom might have plucked these eyes out?

The body and the arms are in a loose style, how does this contrast with the strength of the hair?

Notice the pattern on the clothing, what does this suggest to you?

How do you think the hair has been created and styled?

Why do you think that the illustrator has chosen to allow the top of the hair to continue beyond the top of the page?

Can you see anything in the hair?

The man says, "This is really crazy hair." What 'crazy' things can you imagine happening in the hair that you can't see?

What noises can you hear in this picture as the hair unfurls?

If you could smell anything in this picture what might it be?

How do you feel as you look at this picture?

Where has the artist made you be, in the action, a bystander or an outside observer?

Does where you are affect how you respond to the picture?

It appears that the hair is falling off the page and on to your lap-how does that make you feel?

The hair on the left hand side of the page seems to be trying to write something-what do you think its message might be? Who might this message be for?

The arms and the hair of this man go across the gutter of the page-what affect does this have on you?

How would you describe Bonnie's depiction and size in contrast to the man?

Why has Bonnie been drawn in the bottom left hand corner reaching up and across? What is the impact of this?

Look at the colours chosen to depict Bonnie, what do you notice?

Why do you think we are unable to see Bonnie's facial expressions? What does the illustrator want you to focus on instead?

Bonnie is thrusting a comb towards the man, what is his response to the comb?

Look at the comb and describe how you think it would go through the hair.

The illustrator has packed a lot of movement into this picture. Consider how he has done this?

Look closely at the quality and textures in this picture, how would you describe them?

What do you notice about the illustrator's use of colour?

How has Dave McKean created this picture?

Is there anything that puzzles or surprises you about his techniques?

Can you imagine the rest of this scene beyond the hair and the fingertips - how has the illustrator helped you to do this?

How does your imagination of what is happening in the rest of the picture impact on your interpretation of this page?

How is the text integrated into the overall design of the page?

Notice the thread of a speech bubble and how it directs you as a reader.

How does the layout of the text influence how you read the words and pictures?

Why do you think that different size letters have been used?

What is the effect of using different colours and sizes for the fonts?

WRITE IT DOWN

Harvest children's responses and record their descriptions and comments on a flip chart. Are there any aspects of the picture that they find particularly interesting or puzzling? How do these pictures interact and work with the rest of the book?


Harry and Hopper

Written by Margaret Wild and Illustrated by Freya Blackwood

ISBN 978-1-407111-39-1

Use the first double page spread "When the puppy came to live with Harry and Dad. . . "

Working in pairs, encourage children to explore the picture discussing their responses and working together to make meaning of what they see. Ask them to jot down words and phrases, which reflect their responses to looking.

The aims of this activity are:

  • to increase the interaction with and enjoyment of picture books for children of all ages
  • to develop children's confidence and vocabulary to respond to what they see – to observe and describe
  • to encourage them to build on their previous experience, imagination and understanding to make sense of visual information – to interpret
  • to consider a variety of graphic forms and their interaction with a text in order to convey layers of meaning – to appreciate
  • to recognise different styles and techniques used and developed by a variety of illustrators – to analyse
  • to begin to recognise and appreciate visual metaphor, irony, puns and jokes etc. – to participate

The following questions have been designed to help children to look more closely at the illustrative work of Freya Blackwood moving from the whole picture to the smallest part and to search for and use all available clues given by the artist to make meaning. Please select and adapt the questions to make them appropriate for your setting.

TELL ME ABOUT FREYA BLACKWOOD'S ILLUSTRATION. . .

What is your initial impression of these two pages?

What did you do first, read the words or read the pictures?

How has the layout and shape of this page influenced the way you have read it?

There are no borders to this page, and the background is plain white with no details. Where do you think Hopper has bounded in from?

Why hasn't the illustrator provided a background for this scene? Does it matter?

How has the illustrator involved you in the creation of this scene?

What setting has she helped you to create in your mind's eye?

Where do you think this part of the story is taking place?

What materials do you think the illustrator has used to draw this picture?


Why do you think she has drawn the dog so loosely and not 'rubbed out' any of her sketch lines?

Where does the movement and energy come from in this picture?

What words would you use to describe the ways that Hopper moves?

The gutter is the central part of the book where the pages are stitched together. The illustrator has taken the picture across the gutter, what impact does this have on the speed at which Hopper is crossing the page towards Harry?

What does Hopper's movement tell you about his personality and his relationship with Harry?

What are the predominant colours used on these pages?

What do you notice about the application of colour?

Where is the colour and how does it help to focus your attention?

Hopper's black spots and patches go over the edge of the drawn lines in places, what is the effect of this?

If there were sound effects on this page, what would you hear?

What time of day do you think this is?

How does this page make you feel?

What is the relationship between Harry and Hopper?

How has Freya Blackwood demonstrated the love between Harry and Hopper?

How would you describe Harry's posture? How has he ended up rolling back on the floor in this way?

Look at Harry's face, his eyes are closed, what does this suggest to you about the way he is feeling?

Do you think Harry minds Hopper climbing all over him?

How old do you think Harry might be?

What can you tell about Harry's personality from this illustration? What clues has the illustrator given you?

In what ways do the words interact with the illustration?

Why do you think the dog is so important to Harry?

When a story starts with so much energy and love, how does it help you anticipate what might happen next?

WRITE IT DOWN

Harvest children's responses and record their descriptions and comments on a flip chart. Are there any aspects of the picture that they find particularly interesting or puzzling? How do these pictures interact and work with the rest of the book?


Leon and the Place Between

Written by Angela McAllister and Illustrated by Grahame Baker-Smith

ISBN 978-1-84011-860-5

Use the double page spread depicting Leon holding the white rabbit and the crowd cheering.

Working in pairs, encourage children to explore the picture discussing their responses and working together to make meaning of what they see. Ask them to jot down words and phrases, which reflect their responses to looking.

The aims of this activity are:

  • to increase the interaction with and enjoyment of picture books for children of all ages
  • to develop children's confidence and vocabulary to respond to what they see – to observe and describe
  • to encourage them to build on their previous experience, imagination and understanding to make sense of visual information – to interpret
  • to consider a variety of graphic forms and their interaction with a text in order to convey layers of meaning – to appreciate
  • to recognise different styles and techniques used and developed by a variety of illustrators – to analyse
  • to begin to recognise and appreciate visual metaphor, irony, puns and jokes etc. – to participate

The following questions have been designed to help children to look more closely at the illustrative work of Grahame Baker-Smith moving from the whole picture to the smallest part and to search for and use all available clues given by the artist to make meaning. Please select and adapt the questions to make them appropriate for your setting.

TELL ME ABOUT GRAHAME BAKER-SMITH'S ILLUSTRATION. . .

What is your initial response to this page?

Is there anything that you notice first of all - how is it significant to the story being told?

How do your eyes travel across the page?

Who do you think is the central character on this page and how has your attention been drawn to him?

How is our attention drawn to Leon? What is Leon engulfed in?

What do you notice about his facial expression, is there anything that puzzles you about it?

Symbols float above a garland around Leon, what do they suggest to you?

Where do the symbols lead your eye?

Who do you think is the source of these symbols and what might they mean?

What is your response to Abdul Kazam?

What do you notice about the shape of his face in contrast to Leon's and those of the other children?

How would you describe the colours on this page?

How would you describe the rabbit Leon is clutching?

Compare the depiction of the rabbit with that of the doves. What do you notice?

How would you describe the style used to draw the characters; realistic, caricature, cartoon, stylised etc?

What is the mood on this page?

How is the sense of magic and mystery created by the illustrator?

How has the illustrator created this?

What is the function of the ladder? Where does it lead your eye?

Why has the illustrator used a 'cut-out' in the page and what does it make you do as a reader?

If you were able to hear sounds from these pages, what would they be? How has the illustrator suggested these sounds? How do they make you feel? In what ways do they help to create the magical atmosphere on the page?

What materials do you think Grahame Baker-Smith has used to achieve these visual effects?

Look at his use of texture, application of colour and use of real materials. What is the impact of using mixed materials and techniques?

Where has he given most attention to detail?

Consider his use of light and shade and the way in which he has used this to focus on the central characters.

Where is the light coming from?

Do you have a sense of the time of day? How is this conveyed?

What is the significance of the stars?

What do you notice about the size of the stars and where they have been applied on the page?

What do you notice about the layout of the text and the different styles of font?

What do these make you think of? Do they affect the way that you read the words?

In what ways do the words and pictures work together?

WRITE IT DOWN

Harvest children's responses and record their descriptions and comments on a flip chart. Are there any aspects of the picture that they find particularly interesting or puzzling? How do these pictures interact and work with the rest of the book?


Millie's Marvellous Hat

Written and Illustrated by Satoshi Kitamura

ISBN 978-1-84270-924-5

Use the double page in the park where, "Everyone had a hat of their own and they were all different."

Working in pairs, encourage children to explore the picture discussing their responses and working together to make meaning of what they see. Ask them to jot down words and phrases, which reflect their responses to looking.

The aims of this activity are:

  • to increase the interaction with and enjoyment of picture books for children of all ages
  • to develop children's confidence and vocabulary to respond to what they see – to observe and describe
  • to encourage them to build on their previous experience, imagination and understanding to make sense of visual information – to interpret
  • to consider a variety of graphic forms and their interaction with a text in order to convey layers of meaning – to appreciate
  • to recognise different styles and techniques used and developed by a variety of illustrators – to analyse
  • to begin to recognise and appreciate visual metaphor, irony, puns and jokes etc. – to participate

The following questions have been designed to help children to look more closely at the illustrative work of Satoshi Kitamura moving from the whole picture to the smallest part and to search for and use all available clues given by the artist to make meaning. Please select and adapt the questions to make them appropriate for your setting.

TELL ME ABOUT SATOSHI KITAMURA'S ILLUSTRATION. . .

What is your initial response to this page?

How does it make you feel?

How do your eyes travel across the page?

Notice the directions that people are walking, what affect does this have on how your read the page?

Is there anything in particular that captures your attention, what is it and why?

Who is the central character in this picture?

How is your attention drawn to Millie? What do you notice about her position and stance on the page?

Notice the colours used for Millie's clothing and hat. How do they contrast with the colours on the rest of the page?

Look at Millie's face, how would you describe her facial expression, what does it tell you about how she is feeling?

How has your attention been drawn to the text?

Choose a character or pair of characters and consider the way the illustrator has portrayed them.

What is special about their particular hat/s?

What does each hat tell you about each personality, what they might like doing, what they are thinking about or what job they might do?

Which is your favourite hat and why?

What hat would Millie imagine you to be wearing?

How can you tell the mood of the character, what clues have you been given?

Look at their facial expression, body language, posture and their relationships with other people, what more do these things tell you about them?

Consider the way that they move, how has the illustrator conveyed this?

What can you find out about this setting, the time in history, the time of year, and the time of day?

Why do you think that Satoshi Kitamura chose a park for the setting of this particular scene?

How would you describe the style used to draw the characters; realistic, caricature, cartoon, etc?

Does the way in which the characters have been drawn affect your understanding of their personality and nature?

What medium do you think has been used?

Where is the park, what helps you to decide?

 

Where is the humour to be found in these illustrations?

Where is the movement coming from in this picture?

What do you notice about the use of line and application of colour?

If you could hear sounds coming from this illustration, what might they be?

What would make you revisit this page?

WRITE IT DOWN

Harvest children's responses and record their descriptions and comments on a flip chart. Are there any aspects of the picture that they find particularly interesting or puzzling? How do these pictures interact and work with the rest of the book?


The Dunderheads

Written by Paul Fleischman and Illustrated by David Roberts

ISBN 978-1-4063-2255-2

Use the double page spread, page numbers 22 and 23.

Working in pairs, encourage children to explore the picture discussing their responses and working together to make meaning of what they see. Ask them to jot down words and phrases, which reflect their responses to looking.

The aims of this activity are:

  • to increase the interaction with and enjoyment of picture books for children of all ages
  • to develop children's confidence and vocabulary to respond to what they see – to observe and describe
  • to encourage them to build on their previous experience, imagination and understanding to make sense of visual information – to interpret
  • to consider a variety of graphic forms and their interaction with a text in order to convey layers of meaning – to appreciate
  • to recognise different styles and techniques used and developed by a variety of illustrators – to analyse
  • to begin to recognise and appreciate visual metaphor, irony, puns and jokes etc. – to participate

The following questions have been designed to help children to look more closely at the illustrative work of David Roberts moving from the whole picture to the smallest part and to search for and use all available clues given by the artist to make meaning. Please select and adapt the questions to make them appropriate for your setting.

TELL ME ABOUT DAVID ROBERT'S ILLUSTRATION. . .

How do your eyes move across the page to read this visual image?

How have the pictures been presented for example as a cartoon strip, a series of fragmented images, a freeze frame, a close up etc.?

Why do you think David Roberts has chosen to frame these pictures-what effect do the frames have?

What are you immediately drawn to?

How would you describe these characters-what kind of story do you associate them with?

Which character does the illustrator draw you to the most-why has he done that and how has he done that?

The peacock's cage and Breakbone's house are very similar in shape, why do you think the illustrator has juxtaposed these two structures?

What do you notice about the trees around Breakbone's house, how do they contribute to the atmosphere created?

Have you seen a house like this before? What does this visual image tell you about the character who lives there?

What do you notice about the walls surrounding the house?

The dogs and the signs deter visitors, how does Pencil's body language convey her feelings towards Breakbone and her deterrents?

If you could hear sound effects around Breakbone's house, what would they be?

What is the impact of the technical detail of Pencil's diagrams in terms of your predictions about plot development?

What do these drawings tell you about her character?

What do you notice about the characters in the illustrations for e.g. facial expressions, bodily gestures, their positions in the picture, their movement and size etc?

  who do you think they are-what pictorial clues has the illustrator used?

  what are they doing?

  what is their relationship to one another?

Why do you think the illustrator has chosen to draw the tail of the aeroplane outside the picture border?

What do you notice about the artist's use of line, colour and shading-what medium do you think he has used?

What techniques has the illustrator used to convey movement?

How does the illustrator involve you in the picture for e.g. are you an outside observer, a bystander, a friend, a participant in the action etc?

Are you drawn to revisit the illustration, what more do you learn from it in terms of the story being told?

What is the relationship between the written text and the visual text-what devices has the illustrator used to draw your attention to both at the same time?

How would you describe the illustrations-realistic, zany, comic, cartoon-like, angular, jerky, lively, expressive etc?

How is the tension built in these pictures?

Where are these pictures taking place-can you describe them?

How does the illustrator involve you in the illustrations?

WRITE IT DOWN

Harvest children's responses and record their descriptions and comments on a flip chart. Are there any aspects of the picture that they find particularly interesting or puzzling? How do these pictures interact and work with the rest of the book?


The Graveyard Boook

Written by Neil Gaiman and Illustrated by Chris Riddell

ISBN 978-0-7475-9480-2

Use the illustration on page 55 with the text 'Above them in the sour red skies, things were circling on huge black wings.'

Working in pairs, encourage children to explore the picture discussing their responses and working together to make meaning of what they see. Ask them to jot down words and phrases, which reflect their responses to looking.

The aims of this activity are:

  • to increase the interaction with and enjoyment of picture books for children of all ages
  • to develop children's confidence and vocabulary to respond to what they see – to observe and describe
  • to encourage them to build on their previous experience, imagination and understanding to make sense of visual information – to interpret
  • to consider a variety of graphic forms and their interaction with a text in order to convey layers of meaning – to appreciate
  • to recognise different styles and techniques used and developed by a variety of illustrators – to analyse
  • to begin to recognise and appreciate visual metaphor, irony, puns and jokes etc. – to participate

The following questions have been designed to help children to look more closely at the illustrative work of Chris Riddell moving from the whole picture to the smallest part and to search for and use all available clues given by the artist to make meaning. Please select and adapt the questions to make them appropriate for your setting.

TELL ME ABOUT CHRIS RIDDELL'S ILLUSTRATION. . .

What is the impact on you as a reader of finding an illustration such as this one in a longer read?

How do your eyes travel across this page, when do you notice the caption, is it significant in your interpretation of what you see?

Where is the sense of danger coming from?

This is a black and white line drawing, what do you notice about the illustrator's application of ink and where is it more intense?

Why has the illustrator chosen to place the attacking monsters above Bod rather than below?

Consider the layout of the page and the distance that Chris Riddell has created in order to give power to the attack of the winged beasts.

The illustration has a thin black line border which crops the picture. How does this affect your ability to imagine the rest of the scene beyond the border?

How are you involved with this illustration, are you in the action or an outside observer?

Look at the quality and shape of the beast's wings, how would you describe them?

How has the illustrator conveyed their size and shape?

If you were able to hear, what would be the sounds in this picture?

The beasts are heavily shaded, in contrast to them what do you notice about the detail of line given to the creatures transporting Bod?

Although savage and other worldly these creatures maintain elements of human kind, what are these and how do these symbols affect your attitude towards them?

Bod is perched aloft these formidable characters, what do you notice about the way he has been illustrated in terms of application of ink and density of line?

What do you notice about his facial expression?

How has the illustrator conveyed his youth and innocence?

What is the significance of the claw grasping for Bod's leg?

Look at the features of these creatures, what are the most striking?

Who is the creature in the foreground looking at, how does this make you feel?

There is a great sense of speed and escape in this illustration, how has this been created?

In what ways does the illustration interact with the text?

In what ways does the illustration inform the quality of the images in your minds eye?

WRITE IT DOWN

Harvest children's responses and record their descriptions and comments on a flip chart. Are there any aspects of the picture that they find particularly interesting or puzzling? How do these pictures interact and work with the rest of the book?


The Great Paper Caper

Written and Illustrated by Oliver Jeffers

ISBN 978-0-00-718229-9

Use the double page spread depicting the bear line up at the police station.

Working in pairs, encourage children to explore the picture discussing their responses and working together to make meaning of what they see. Ask them to jot down words and phrases, which reflect their responses to looking.

The aims of this activity are:

  • to increase the interaction with and enjoyment of picture books for children of all ages
  • to develop children's confidence and vocabulary to respond to what they see – to observe and describe
  • to encourage them to build on their previous experience, imagination and understanding to make sense of visual information – to interpret
  • to consider a variety of graphic forms and their interaction with a text in order to convey layers of meaning – to appreciate
  • to recognise different styles and techniques used and developed by a variety of illustrators – to analyse
  • to begin to recognise and appreciate visual metaphor, irony, puns and jokes etc. – to participate

The following questions have been designed to help children to look more closely at the illustrative work of Oliver Jeffers moving from the whole picture to the smallest part and to search for and use all available clues given by the artist to make meaning. Please select and adapt the questions to make them appropriate for your setting.

TELL ME ABOUT OLIVER JEFFERS' ILLUSTRATION. . .

How do you read these two pages?

What is your immediate response to the bear?

How would you describe the bear's position on the page - what effect does this have on the reader?

Can you relate to or empathise with the bear -why has he been drawn in this way?

What do you notice about the bears in the line up?

Why do you think the teddy is the only one without stick legs?

What is the impact of the shadows around the bears and how do they give emphasis to the polar bears attitude to brown bear?

What do you notice about the polar bear's body language and facial expression?

How do you feel towards brown bear in the line up and how does this contrast with your attitude towards him in handcuffs on the next page?

Oliver Jeffers has used light and shade powerfully in both these pictures, what affect do they have on how you view the characters?

How does the illustrator's attention to detail in both pictures control the way in which you read these pages?

Do you notice any humour or jokes, how has the illustrator engaged your attention?

When and where are these scenes taking place?

How has the illustrator drawn your attention to these details?

How would you describe the interrogation room?

What do you notice about the composition of this picture?

Why has the illustrator chosen to include so many artefacts what is their effect?

What is the significance of the other characters in the picture?

What do you know about the new characters introduced in these pages? How has the illustrator conveyed elements of their personality and attitudes?

How much has the illustrator involved you in telling this part of the story?

How does the illustrator involve you in the illustration, e.g. an outside observer, a bystander, a friend, a participant in the action etc?

How has this picture been created for example, pen and ink, watercolour etc?

How does the use of colour influence the mood and atmosphere of the picture?

What do you notice about the layout and font of the text, how does it interact with these pictures?

How would you describe the style Oliver Jeffers has used to draw the characters, realistic, caricature, cartoon, etc?

WRITE IT DOWN

Harvest children's responses and record their descriptions and comments on a flip chart. Are there any aspects of the picture that they find particularly interesting or puzzling? How do these pictures interact and work with the rest of the book?


There Are Cats in this Book

Written and llustrated by Viviane Schwarz

ISBN 978-1-4063-0094-9

Use the double page spread DEPICTING THE CATS UNDER THE BLANKET with multiple flaps.

Working in pairs, encourage children to explore the picture discussing their responses and working together to make meaning of what they see. Ask them to jot down words and phrases, which reflect their responses to looking.

The aims of this activity are:

  • to increase the interaction with and enjoyment of picture books for children of all ages
  • to develop children's confidence and vocabulary to respond to what they see – to observe and describe
  • to encourage them to build on their previous experience, imagination and understanding to make sense of visual information – to interpret
  • to consider a variety of graphic forms and their interaction with a text in order to convey layers of meaning – to appreciate
  • to recognise different styles and techniques used and developed by a variety of illustrators – to analyse
  • to begin to recognise and appreciate visual metaphor, irony, puns and jokes etc. – to participate

The following questions have been designed to help children to look more closely at the illustrative work of Viviane Schwarz, moving from the whole picture to the smallest part and to search for and use all available clues given by the artist to make meaning. Please select and adapt the questions to make them appropriate for your setting.

TELL ME ABOUT VIVIANE SCHWARZ'S ILLUSTRATION. . .

What colours have been used for the blanket?

What time of day does the blanket make you think of? Why?

What words would you use to describe how the cats might be feeling under this blanket?

What does the illustrator's choice of font and layout of the text tell you about the cats that are under the blanket-how many do you think there are?

What do you think you will see when you turn back the blanket?

Turn back the blanket. How would you describe the expressions on the cat's faces?

Look at the cat's eyes – how has the illustrator used their eye shapes to depict their sleepiness, surprise and pleasure?

The red cat has a speech bubble, how does this help you to understand the way s/he's thinking?

Can you make up a speech or thought bubble for the blue and yellow cats to show how you think they are feeling?

Who are the cats looking at?

How do you think s/he is feeling about you looking at them?

How has the illustrator involved you in this story?

As you lift each flap what more do the pictures reveal about the cat's characters-how would you describe them now?

What do their facial expressions, features and bodily gestures tell you about their personalities and character?

How would you describe this illustrative style?

What do you notice about the outlines and the application of colour on the characters and objects?

Why do you think Viviane Schwarz has chosen to use these colours for the cats?

What medium do you think has been used?

How do the speech bubbles help you to find out more about the cats personalities?

Who are the cats talking to?

There is no background or background colour on these pages. How has the illustrator used the blanket to help set the scene for you?

What further setting does the blanket help you to create in your mind's eye?

Where do you think this story is taking place?

Look at the right hand page of this double page spread (under all the flaps).

The red cat is pulling on a piece of wool. How has the illustrator created the tension on that thread? Look at the angle of the wool and the angle of the red cat's body. Look at its toes; it seems as if its claws are gripping into the floor.

What is the effect of that illustration on you as a reader? What does it make you want to do?

WRITE IT DOWN

Harvest children's responses and record their descriptions and comments on a flip chart/IAW. Are there any aspects of the picture that they find particularly interesting or puzzling? How do these pictures interact and work with the rest of the book?